Stand Up Paddleboard Tour

  • Image of a standup paddleboard at Tarpon Bay Explorers

  • Image of the standup paddleboard tour at Tarpon Bay Explorers

  • Image of the standup paddleboard tour at Tarpon Bay Explorers

  • Image of wildlife on the standup paddleboard tour at Tarpon Bay Explorers

Stand Up Paddleboard Tour

Walk on water with an experienced naturalist on a stand up paddleboard (SUP) through Tarpon Bay. This tour is for all skill levels and launches directly from our location. The first portion of the trip begins with a lesson from your certified guide and naturalist. Beginners will be able to learn basic techniques, while experienced paddlers will be able to not only fine-tune their skills, but also learn advanced strokes and techniques. The trip is not just a lesson, but also an eco-tour where the naturalist will search for and talk about the diverse wildlife of J.N. “Ding” Darling’s rich mangrove estuary. While paddling through the vast waters of Tarpon Bay, visitors may experience birds, fish, stingrays, dolphins and much more! Must be 13 years and older to participate. RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED (CALL 239-472-8900).

 

Important:

  •  No Swimming, snorkeling or getting off the Paddleboard
  • Tarpon Bay Explorers’ Equipment must stay within Tarpon Bay
  • 1 hour minimum, between 8am & Rentals stop 2 hours before closing
  • If fishing, persons 16 years of age or older must purchase a Florida saltwater fishing license: MyFWC.com

Did You Know?

Stand up paddleboarding has been around for thousands of years. Though the direct origin of the sport is disputed between historians and professionals alike, many ancient cultures adapted the sport into their everyday routine. 3,000 years ago, fishermen from the Chan Chan civilization, located in present day Peru, used “caballitos de totora,”which translates to little horses made of reed. These were watercraft made from reeds that fisherman used while fishing. Fishermen would paddle against rough surf to their fishing holes to gather their daily haul. Upon their return, the fishermen would surf their way back to shore using a bamboo stick as a double-ended paddle.